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LPM Newsletter

August 19, 2015

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In This Issue

Tech Tuesday

Total Mail Converter Pro
William C. Groh, III
Tuesday, Sept. 22
Noon–12:30 p.m.

Click here for webinar archives.

Quick Links


Reba Nance

Three Key Questions You Should Ask Every Potential Client Before You Agree to Represent Them

Client intake sounds pretty simple. Meet with the client, get their contact info, discuss the particulars of their case and how you can help them, ascertain their ability to pay and agree on the terms of your representation. That’s it, right? Actually, there are three outside-the-box questions you should consider asking. The answers could mean the difference between a successful representation and your worst nightmare.

Here are the three questions:

  1. In a perfect world, what would the ideal outcome be for you?
    The answer to this question alone could be a deal breaker. If you are representing a potential client in a personal injury case, it is critical to know if their expectations are out line. If you believe the case is worth somewhere around $300,000, but they tell you they want $2,000,000, there’s clearly a problem. You could do absolutely everything right in your representation, but the client is never going to be happy.
  2. What would be the worst outcome?
    The answer can cut both ways. If you think their idea of the worst outcome is very possible (or even probable), now is the time to discuss it. If the likelihood of their worst outcome is remote, this can count in your favor.
  3. What information might come out that you’re worried about, or that you’d rather not be known?
    A Denver lawyer once told me he was representing a woman in a child custody case. They were in court when opposing counsel asks her “isn’t it true that you were working for an outcall massage company last year?” My lawyer friend was completely taken aback. When he finally got his client alone, he asked her “why didn’t you tell me this?” Her answer? “You didn’t ask me, and I didn’t think anyone would find out.” He told me he went back to his office at the end of the day and revised the questions on his client intake sheet!

Feel free to contact me with questions at reban@cobar.org.


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Quick Tips
Product Reviews
Technology

Six Ways Your Smartphone Can Streamline Your Law Practice

Melanie Atkinson, Attorney at Work
The proliferation of smartphones and tablets in the workplace has dramatically changed how business is conducted, and the legal profession is no exception. Nearly everyone has a mobile device, but how many of us use these devices to their full potential? Think about how you are using your smartphone in your daily affairs. Can that same technology do even more to help you give your clients the best possible representation? Read more.

Making the Case for Case Management Software

Charity Anastasio, NWSidebar
Do you feel like you need a better system for file management? There are many options, but each case management software platform is a hub for handling all information and tasks related to your cases. Read more.

Every Legal App For Android

Lisa Needham, Lawyerist
There are plenty of Android apps for lawyers including apps for case management, billing, trial preparation, and legal research. This list includes every legal app for Android that we could find in the Google Play store. Read more.

Marketing

Your Clients Do Not Want to be Sold

Cordell Parvin, Cordell Parvin Blog
Your clients do not want to be sold. But, when they need legal help, they want to buy legal services from someone who makes it easy. Read more.

Which Social Media Platforms Are Important for Lawyers?

Editors, Attorney at Work
If you’re on no other platform professionally, you should be on LinkedIn. It’s the most comprehensive social media platform for professionals, providing opportunities to do the following: Read more.
Join the CBA’s LinkedIn Group!

Twitter & How to Dominate your Market

Podcast with Jacob Sapochnick and Joel Comm, Enchanting Lawyer
“Social media is really just the online element of how we build relationships” — Joel Comm. Read more.

Finance

8 Reasons Your Law Firm Isn’t Increasing Revenue (Infographic)

Tim Baran, Legal Productivity
Last month, we compiled a guide to assessing, predicting, and maximizing law firm revenue. The guide discusses how to get a handle on your top-line revenue figures, how to identify hard-to-spot gaps in revenue that impact your bottom line everyday, how to use data to make informed decisions, hidden ways to increase your firm’s revenue, and what to do when you’re facing slow or no-pay situations. Read more.

If Donald Trump Managed Your Law Office

David M. Ward, Attorney at Work
If Donald Trump managed your law office, you’d be in for one hell of a ride. On the first day he arrived, he’d call a meeting and lay out the plan to take you into the big (or bigger) leagues. Read more.

Human Resources

Take Care Of Your Staff As Soon As You’re Able

John G. Balestriere, Above the Law
This may be an obvious rule of management, but it’s followed painfully rarely. At a law firm, your staff members are everything. Treat them as well as you can and, even in a new or growing law office, do so as quickly as you can. Read more.

Time Management

Time Management for Lawyers: Handling Large Projects

Jared Correia, MassLOMAP
The common perception is that big projects equal big headaches; but, really, it’s just a question of management. The issue that most businesspersons have with big projects is that can’t get over the hump of breaking them down, and managing the constituent parts. Oftentimes, big projects get ignored until they’re about to become due. Of course, then, it’s a scramble to get them completed, the work suffers, and everybody start to think that big projects are really just big headaches, all over again. It’s a vicious cycle. Read more.

How Lawyers Can Do More in Less Time

Podcast with Sharon Nelson, Jim Calloway and Allison Shields, the Lawyerist
In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Allison Shields, co-author of “How to Do More in Less Time: The Complete Guide to Improving Your Productivity and Increasing Your Bottom Line.” Allison discusses why she wrote the book, productivity mistakes lawyers often make, and specific suggestions she has for increasing time efficiency. Read more.